Interview 25

8 January 2015

 

What were you like at school?
Quiet, disciplined, attentive.

Were you good at English?
Yes; it was my favorite subject. In my last year, I was so ahead of the other students; I was allowed to only come to class when there was a test.

What are your ambitions for your writing career?
To have one of my books become a bestseller.

What are you working on at the minute?
The next book in the series: Blind Chess.

What’s it about?
It picks up where Danse Macabre ends.

What genre are your books?
Mystery.

What draws you to this genre?
I’ve always loved a good whodunit. It’s fun to construct a puzzle for others to solve… leaving little clues here and there along the story.

Do you write full-time or part-time?
Part-time. I have a day job that I love and that pays the bills. Writing is my hobby, and a breath of fresh air from reality.

Do you have a special time to write or how is your day structured?
I can only write on the weekends and during Holidays. But I spend a lot of time, during the week, day-dreaming about my story and imagining scenes.

Do you aim for a set amount of words/pages per day?
No. I don’t keep a schedule. I write when I feel like it.

Do you write on a typewriter, computer, dictate or longhand?
Computer. I couldn’t imagine doing it any other way. It’s the quickest, easiest to correct.

Do you work to an outline or plot or do you prefer just see where an idea takes you?
Creating a detailed outline is my first step, when writing a book. It’s the backbone of the story. Then I flesh it out.

What is the hardest thing about writing?
Editing. I takes me twice the time I spent writing the manuscript. I over-analyze everything, obsess over punctuation, and hunt adverbs with a battle axe.

How long on average does it take you to write a book?
It depends on what is going on in my life and how much free time I have on my hands. About a year, I would say.

Do you ever get writer’s block?
Not really no. That’s why planning the novel and having a detailed outline is important.

Any tips on how to get through the dreaded writer’s block?
Plan your novel carefully. Know ahead all the major story points. If you still get writer’s block, then give up the novel for a while and write something else until it passes.

What is your favourite motivational phrase?
Courage, fuyons! It’s French and translates to “Let’s be courageous and run away/flee”. I know, as motivational phrases go, it sucks but it’s my go-to phrase. I’ve been saying it since forever. It’s full of irony and a bit hard to explain to non-French speakers. It’s the thing we say here when we’d rather just run away, but we have to stay and do whatever it is

 

Originally posted @ Our Families Adventure